Apr 262010
 

Dedicated to my granddaughters, Samantha and Aubrey, who are fine young women and talented hockey players. I am very proud of them both.

Threw on my pads, slipped on my skates
Grabbed my stick and rushed through the gates
Buzzed around the ice, so cold and slick
Nothin’ like a grip on a hockey stick cause…

I’m a hockey girl
I’m a hockey girl
Love the game that’s fast and rough
Love the game, never get enough

Took a pass, knocked a girl down
Grabbed that puck and went to town
Split the defense, I was on a roll
Took my best shot and scored a goal

I’m a hockey girl
A hockey girl
Love the game that’s fast and rough
Love the game, never get enough

A man said, Hockey girl, come play against me
He gave me the elbow, gave me the knee
“This is a man’s game sweetie,” is what he said
“Give it up, darlin”—and I saw red! Cause…

I’m a hockey girl
A hockey girl
Love the game that’s fast and rough
Love the game, never get enough

That man sneered as he rushed my way
But I stopped him cold, stole the puck away
Dropped him like a stone with a solid hip check
Didn’t look back when he hit the deck! Cause…

I’m a hockey girl
A hockey girl
Love the game that’s fast and rough
Love the game, never get enough

Mastered the slap shot, learned how to deke
Scored my first hat trick just last week
Heard the crowd roar when we won the game
I found my passion and my life is not the same… cause

I’m a hockey girl
A hockey girl
Love the game that’s fast and rough
Love the game, never get enough

Bonded with the other girls on my team
Making the Olympics is my dream
Playing for my country would be so nice
I’d be the happiest player on the ice… cause

I’m a hockey girl
A hockey girl
Love the game that’s fast and rough
Love the game, never get enough!


If you can believe it, there’s a whole collection of poems and lyrics all about Hockey called Going Top Shelf: An Anthology of Canadian Hockey Poetry. Would you consider this bookshelf or bathroom reading material?

Nov 192009
 

What the Preston Rivulettes were to women’s hockey in Ontario in the 1930s, The Roverines were to Newfoundland. According to hockey researcher — writer Bob White, the name of Roverines was derived from the Rovers’ moniker, a men’s team from Bay Roberts, Newfoundland. The Roverines, comprised of young women from the ages of 16 to 18, played in a women’s league for three seasons in the late 30s. In 1938 they captured the All- Newfoundland Ladies Championship.

“It was a long time ago,” says Mereida Roach Murphy, who now lives in St. John’s, Newfoundland. “What I remember was the good times we had playing and traveling around together. Oh, we enjoyed it a lot.”

Back then there were only five teams for women in Newfoundland, but they attracted a strong following wherever they played. They would travel from town to town by train. At first the fans were intrigued by the novelty of women playing hockey, but once they saw them in action, it became obvious these players had mastered the fundamentals and took the game seriously.

Spectators filled the small arenas to watch the women at play, and there were as many more outside “seaming” the game. “Seaming” was a term used to describe fans who watched as much of the action as possible through the cracks were scenes in the arena walls. The “seamers” were those who couldn’t raise the money [$.50] to buy a ticket for the game in those depression days.

Oct 072009
 
Canadian woman athlete of the half-century

Canadian woman athlete of the half-century

The female hockey player of the decade in the 1920s was Toronto’s all-round athlete Bobby (Fanny) Rosenfeld, a member of the 1928 Canadian Olympic track-and-field team and a gold medal winner.  Rosenfeld, whose first love was hockey, excelled at all sports except swimming.  She joined Ethel Smith, Jane Bell and Myrtle Cook and swept to Olympic gold in the 400-metre relay in world-record time.

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Oct 062009
 

When the 19th annual Dominion ladies hockey tournament was held in Mississauga in 1986, one of the players on the US  team  played despite a handicap.  Patty Koch, 19, of Bridgeport, New York, was born without a right arm.

“The first time other players meet up with me on the ice, they kind of shy away from me,” Koch said, laughing.  “Then when they see I play the game just like they do, they come right after me.”

All hockey fans love a good hockey story. Check out:
(in Canada) or (in the US) or check it out at your local library.

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